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Self-Check Answers

    Alliteration: “bare / black” Repetition: “His wife . . . His daughter . . . his son” Simile: “like dried peach halves” Metaphor: “this scrap of his voice”

    Self-Check 6
    1. Explication is a line-by-line examination of a particular text. Analysis is a discussion of a partcular aspect or element of a text, such as tone, characterization, or the use of figurative language. 2. The term audience refers to the people who will be reading an essay. 3. The topic of a work of fiction or poetry is the subject matter of the work. The purpose is the author’ s intention in writing, which may be simply to entertain or to reveal a deeper truth about human nature. 4. When quoting a short passage—four or fewer lines of a text—the quoted passage should be introduced directly into an essay and enclosed in quotation marks. Use a forward slash to indicate any line breaks. For example, if you quoted lines 31–33 from “Theme for English B” by Langston Hughes, you would punctuate it as follows: “You are white— / yet a part of me, as I am a part of you. / That’s American.” Longer quotations, consisting of more than four typed lines of fiction or three typed lines of poetry, should be inserted on a new line without quotation marks, indented twice as far from the left margin, and double spaced. 5. Proper citation includes the author’s name (last name first), the title of the work (either underlined, italicized, or enclosed in quoation marks, depending on the nature of the work cited) followed by a period. This information is followed name of the the city in which the publisher is located, a colon, and the name of the publisher, followed by a comma and the year (enclosed in parentheses) in which the work was published. If specific pages are referenced, the page numbers are identified, preceded by a colon.

    Self-Check Answers